NEW HAMPSHIRE GENEALOGY & HISTORY
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NEW HAMPSHIRE HISTORY & GENEALOGY
    
No family genealogy is complete without understand the history
of the state or area in which they lived


United States History | New England History | History of New Hampshire
Multi-County/Regional History

History of Individual COUNTIES
Belknap | Carroll | Cheshire | Coos | Grafton | Hillsborough | Merrimack | Rockingham
Strafford | Sullivan

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UNITED STATES HISTORY

NEW ENGLAND HISTORY


HISTORY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE (STATEWIDE)

MULTI-COUNTY / REGIONAL HISTORY

     COUNTY/TOWN - GENERAL HISTORY

  • See the individual COUNTY sections of this web site for individual town or city histories

NEW HAMPSHIRE COUNTIES (individual) HISTORY

BELKNAP COUNTY HISTORY


CARROLL COUNTY HISTORY
Carroll County was taken from the northern part of Strafford and incorporated December 22, 1840. It was named in honor of Charles Carroll, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence, who died in 1832.


CHESHIRE COUNTY HISTORY
Cheshire County is said to be named from Cheshire, one of the western counties of England. It was one of the five original counties into which the province was divided, including within its limits and the present county of Sullivan. It was incorporated March 19, 1771, Keene and Charlestown being made shire towns. July 5, 1827 the county was divided, its northern half being taken to form the county of Sullivan. This division left Cheshire County as it is today. Of the twenty-three townships, eight were incorporated in the reign of George II, ten in the reign of George III, and give under the government of New Hampshire.


COOS COUNTY HISTORY
Coos (pronounced Co-os) country was set off from the northern part of Grafton and incorporated December 24, 1803, to take effect march 1, 1805. The name is an Indian word, meaning crooked, used in that section of the province in reference to the winding course of the Connecticut river at Lancaster (which was originally called Upper Cohoes), and at Haverhil (originally Lower Cohoes).


GRAFTON COUNTY HISTORY
Grafton county was incorporated by the act which took effect march 19, 1771, and was subjected to the same period of suspension as Strafford County. It was named in honor of Augustus Henry Fitzroy, third Duke of Grafton (1735-1811)


HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY HISTORY
Hillsborough County was named by Governor Wentworth in honor of Wills Hill, first Viscount Hillsborough (1718-93), secretary of state for the colonies.


MERRIMACK COUNTY HISTORY
Merrimack county was formed from the northern part of Rockingham and Hillsborough, and incorporated July 1, 1823, to take effect August 1, 1823. The name was derived from the Merrimac river, which flows through the middle of the county.


ROCKINGHAM COUNTY (NH) HISTORY
Rockingham county, incorporated March 19, 1771, was named by Governor Wentworth in honor of his kinsman, Charles Watson Wentworth, second Marquis of Rockingham (1730-82).


STRAFFORD COUNTY HISTORY
Strafford County was incorporated by the act which took effect march 19, 1771, but the organization of this county was suspended until ordered by the Governor and Council. This was done in 1773, and the county records are from that date. The order was probably issued in 1772, but the exact date is not ascertainable, because the Council records for that year are incomplete. Strafford County was named in honor of Governor Wentowrth's kinsman, William Wentworth, fourth Earl of Strafford.


SULLIVAN COUNTY HISTORY
Sullivan county was cut from the northern part of Cheshire and incorporated July 5, 1827. It was named in honor of John Sullivan, Major-General in the Revolutionary army, and afterwards President of new Hampshire.


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